Credit Gateway

Common Questions

What is the Credit Gateway?

The Credit Gateway is a deposit program that the U.S. Treasury’s Bureau of the Fiscal Service uses for the receipt of federal agency Fedwire and Automated Clearing House (ACH) credit transactions.

Who serves as the Fiscal Service’s points of contact?

Within the Fiscal Service’s Revenue Collection Management (RCM) Assistant Commissioner area, responsibility for the Gateway is with the Settlement Services Division. The Credit Gateway itself is a service operated by the Fiscal Service's designated financial agent, US Bank.

Agencies should direct operational questions (i.e., questions relating to specific Credit Gateway transactions) to US Bank’s Credit Gateway Customer Care. Customer Care can be reached at 1 (877) 815-1206 or 1 (314) 425-1841 or at customer.care@USBank.com.

Agencies can direct other questions (such as account setup questions or general Credit Gateway program features) to the Settlement Services Division. The Settlement Services Division Credit Gateway program area can be contacted at (202) 874-5282 or (202) 874-5304 or by e-mail at settlement.services@fms.treas.gov.

How does the settlement process operate?

Funds settle through routing numbers at Federal Reserve Banks. For any legacy programs that settled transactions to routing numbers at Federal Reserve Banks (including FDS, REX, and FR-ETA), funds settle in the same manner as they have previously.

How will agency reporting be provided?

Information is best accessed through the Fiscal Service’s Collections Information Repository (CIR). Please note that the reporting information below does not apply to Federal Tax Collection Service transactions. In general, detail-level information on these transactions is provided through other systems to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). CIR only has summary-level information on tax transactions.

Fedwire

Fedwire information is available with detailed transaction data on a near real-time basis in CIR. CIR also has deposit/voucher ticket numbers available after the end of the Fedwire banking day. CIR has the ability to provide agencies with automated, downloadable files as well.

ACH Credit

ACH credit information is available on the morning of the settlement date in CIR. This includes detailed information on settled transactions, including deposit/voucher ticket numbers. It also includes details on future-dated ACH credit transactions for selected agencies. (“Future-dated” ACH credits are entries we have received, but which will not settle on the current banking date.) CIR has the ability to provide agencies with automated, downloadable files as well. These automated files from CIR can include data on future-dated ACH items if the agency so desires.

The table below summarizes agency reporting.

Agency Reporting
Fedwire
ACH Credit
Availability of viewable information in CIR Summary and detail information is available after the close of the banking day Summary and detail information is available on the morning of the settlement date and includes information on future-dated ACH credits for selected agencies
Availability of automated, downloadable files from CIR Available after close of the banking day Available on the morning of the settlement date and includes information on future-dated ACH credits for selected agencies

What is an account number, why does it matter, and how will it be used?

Through Credit Gateway Account Numbers, the Credit Gateway standardizes the way that we associate Fedwire and ACH credit transactions with your agency or a specific cash flow. Unlike legacy systems FDS and REX—which each had legacy account numbers of different lengths and structures—the Credit Gateway employs a 12-digit account number. The gateway employs two versions of this account number: Converted and New. There are some differences between these numbers to accommodate the legacy account numbers that FDS and REX had employed, but they have the same general structure.

The Credit Gateway Account number is important for several reasons. Among other things, it allows us to associate Fedwire and ACH credit transactions with both an Agency Location Code (ALC) and a cash flow. It also has implications for agency and GWA reporting, as set out in the following sections.

Fedwire

Converted Account Numbers—Historically, some agencies used eight-digit ALCs as their FDS Account number. The ALCs also were sometimes known as the Fedwire Beneficiary IDs. (In practice, we have not used the concept of an account number when referring to how we organized FDS transactions; instead, we simply organized transactions around an agency’s ALC. However, "account number" and "ALC" are broad and not always synonymous terms, so it is sometimes necessary to distinguish between them even if in FDS they were the same.) Remitters may include this information when they initiate a payment. Because the FDS Account number was the ALC, we had no standard means to allow agencies to track cash flows at a level under the ALC.

The Credit Gateway assigns each of these legacy FDS agencies a Converted Credit Gateway Account Number. The Converted Account Number is 12 digits. It begins with a leading "8," is followed by the agency’s eight-digit ALC, and ends with three zeros. (Example: 822222222000; where 22222222 is the agency’s Fedwire Beneficiary ID and ALC). Use by an agency’s remitters of the Converted Account Number code is optional; the remitters may continue to simply use the agency’s ALC. If a remitter includes an ALC in a payment, we map it to the appropriate Converted Account Number.

New Account Numbers—For new accounts, the Credit Gateway issues each account a New Credit Gateway Account Number. All new gateway accounts are 12 digits and being with a leading “8”, followed by the agency’s eight-digit ALC, and ending with three-digit suffix that is sequentially system generated. If an agency has more than one cash flow associated with the same ALC, we iterate the three-digit suffix to treat each of an agency’s cash flows as a new, separate account.

ACH Credit

Converted Account Numbers—Historically, agencies used a dedicated, six-digit account ID for each REX account. Remitters included this information when they initiated a payment. An agency could have more than one REX Account Number associated with its ALC. Among other things, this allowed for REX Account Numbers to be established at the cash flow level, rather than the ALC level.

Under the Credit Gateway, each agency is assigned a Converted Credit Gateway Account Number for each of its existing REX Account IDs. The Credit Gateway Account Number is 12 digits. It begins with “800”, is followed by the agency’s six-digit REX Account ID, and ends with three zeros. (Example: 800111111000; where 111111 is the agency’s REX Account ID). Use of the converted Credit Gateway Account Number by remitters is optional; remitters may continue to simply use the legacy REX Account ID. If a remitter includes a REX Account ID in a payment, we map it to the appropriate converted Credit Gateway Account Number.

Effective, February 2013 all valid ALC numbers were made eligible to accept ACH credits within the Credit Gateway. Agencies should contact the Credit Gateway program to obtain ACH instructions to be provided to their customers. For new accounts, the Credit Gateway issues each account a New Credit Gateway Account ID. All new gateway accounts are 12 digits and being with a leading “8”, followed by the agency’s eight-digit ALC, and ending with three-digit suffix that is sequentially system generated. If an agency has more than one cash flow associated with the same ALC, we iterate the three-digit suffix to treat each of an agency’s cash flows as a new, separate account.

The table below summarizes this discussion.

Account #s
Fedwire
ACH Credit
Format of legacy FDS/REX Account ID numbers 8-digit ALC 6-digit REX Account ID
Granularity of legacy FDS/REX accounts ALC level ALC and cash flow level
Format of Converted Account Number 12 digits: 8 + ALC + 000 12 digits: 800 + REX Account ID + 000
Granularity of Converted Account Number ALC level ALC and cash flow level
Use of Converted Account Number by remitters Optional. If a remitter provides an ALC in a payment, we map it to the Converted Credit Gateway Account Number Optional. If a remitter provides REX Account ID in a payment, we map it to the Converted Credit Gateway Account Number
Format of New Account Number 12 digits: 8 + ALC + 3-digit cash flow identifier 12 digits: 8 + ALC + 3-digit cash flow identifier
Granularity of New Account Number ALC and cash flow level ALC and cash flow level

How are account numbers used in agency reporting?

The rules governing account numbers impact how agencies access transaction data within CIR. In all cases, CIR allows searches by ALC. The 12 digit Credit Gateway account number is called the Agency Account ID in CIR and can be queried at that level.

How does GWA reporting occur?

Both the converted and new Credit Gateway Account Numbers double as Classification Keys (C-Keys) in the Shared Accounting Module (SAM) program, which is in the Fiscal Service’s Governmentwide Accounting (GWA) Assistant Commissioner area. Use of the C-Key allows for the classification of an agency’s transactions to Treasury Account Symbols and Business Event Type Codes (TAS/BETCs).

Before an agency becomes a GWA reporter for collections, the SAM Team will work with the agency to assign the appropriate TAS and BETC to the agency’s Credit Gateway Account Number. We are able to report this C-Key to GWA so that the agency’s information is properly classified to a TAS/BETC. The New Credit Gateway Account Number is especially useful in this regard, because it allows for Fedwire transactions to be broken down by cash flow.

To begin the process of associating a TAS and BETC to the agency’s Credit Gateway Account Number(s), contact the SAM Team at (314) 444-4238 or (314) 444-6248 or by e-mail at sam.conversion@stls.frb.org.

How will deposit/voucher tickets be numbered?

We base the deposit/voucher ticket number associated with each day’s deposits on a combination of the day of the month and a sequence number. The numbering scheme is slightly different for Fedwire deposits and ACH credit deposits. (IMPORTANT: Agencies should not build business logic around these numbers.)

What will happen if a remitter provides incorrect information with a payment?

Generally, if a remitter fails to follow payment instructions, the Credit Gateway automatically reverses (Fedwire) or returns (ACH) the transaction. We generally do not attempt to manually correct the transaction. In particular, we typically reverse/return the transaction if a remitter fails to use either a valid, configured:

ALC (for a Fedwire or ACH transaction) or REX Account ID (for an ACH credit transaction);

Converted Credit Gateway Account Number; or

New Credit Gateway Account Number

We may attempt to manually correct certain Fedwire transactions above a certain dollar threshold.

How are ALC corrections handled?

Although generally we do not correct transactions with incorrect transaction data, there may be instances in which corrections are needed. For instance, a remitter may send a payment using a valid, configured account number, but one that is associated with the ALC of another agency.

The Credit Gateway is able to correct erroneous ALC information for those transactions originally processed through the Credit Gateway. Requests for ALC changes to Credit Gateway transactions should be initiated through the Credit Gateway Customer Care, using the contact information provided above.

How are agency-initiated Fedwire reversals and ACH returns handled?

Fedwire reversals and ACH returns that agencies need to initiate are possible through the Gateway. Requests for reversals and returns should be directed to the Credit Gateway Customer Care, using the contact information provided above.


   Last Updated:  March 14, 2014